Wednesday, April 12, 2006

French Students

The French are so easy to make fun of it's not even fair.

Last week, 1 million demonstrators, mostly students, protested nationwide against a proposed equal-opportunity law which would have allowed employers to fire workers under the age of 26 at anytime during a two-year trial period.

You've got to be kidding me. French guys already have an unfair advantage with that magical panty-removing accent - now they want continued guaranteed employment? It's ridiculous that an entire country's student body is so incompetent that they're scared of holding a job based on something as "crazy" as job performance. Sure, here in the U.S. we have our own mass protests over illegal immigration legislation - but after hearing about this, I'd hire a Mexican on a street corner over a lazy-ass Sorbonne graduate any day. I'm finally beginning to understand why the Le Car sucked so much.

And the best part of this story - this week, the French government actually caved into the pressure and abandoned the law. Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin, the main proponent of the job law, said he backed down after two months of holding firm amid street protests because "We had to get out of the crisis." Which is basically a fancy way of saying "I no longer have testicles."

Apparently, the French government is daring the world to make fun of them by doing exactly what they're historically famous for: surrendering. Okay, I'll concede that the Nazis were pretty scary - but a bunch of lazy college kids skipping class? Come on.

I told you the French were easy to make fun of.

9 Comments:

At 2:03 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

the french smell bad too

 
At 4:17 PM, Anonymous Chanakin said...

Shouldn't they be working instead of protesting?

I'll give them this though... we stuck our heads in the sand and let employers get away with "at will" employment - exactly the same thing they protested against.

 
At 7:54 PM, Blogger Cibbuano said...

Me, I love the French. They're so chill compared to us uptight English.

Chanakin: 'at will' employment?

 
At 12:30 AM, Anonymous Chanakin said...

"At Will" means you can quit your job whenever and for whatever reason you want(if there is no employment contract).

It also means employers can terminate you whenever and for whatever reason they want (if there is no employment contract).

The labor laws are pretty weak, so an employer must violate a specific state or Federal law, or constitutional provision in order to satisfy "Wrongful Termination".

 
At 6:00 AM, Anonymous Cal said...

Thanx to Chanakin for clarifying this point.

I think those demonstrations were worthwhile: working 2 years, fearing getting fired at any time for no reason whatsoever is not acceptable.

 
At 6:07 AM, Anonymous Cal said...

Saying that de Villepin doesn't have balls is outrageous: if memory serves, he was leading the few brave ones who were standing up at the UN against big bad Bush and his pathetihc Irak war and all the lies that went with it.

 
At 8:37 AM, Anonymous naomi said...

Cal- completely disagree with you and Chanakin. The whole purpose of the law was to reduce unemployment - especially in the suburbs where youth unemployment is skyrocketing. I personally think "at-will" employment here in the US is the way to go. Now the idiot French government is going to give companies subsides instead to hire more workers than they need. You really think that's a better alternative?

 
At 11:05 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I agree with Naomi - more government subsides is stupid. Why are there so many damn socialists??? Haven't you figured out that it doesn't work?

 
At 12:08 PM, Anonymous Chanakin said...

"At Will" first came about in 1877, and was an agreement between master and servant.

The courts adopted that rule as common law. There is no "at will" legislation - it exists in case law.

It was not meant to reduce unemployment.

 

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